SFB 80: RNA-DECO
Decorating RNA
for a purpose

Chemical modifications of RNAs allow the dynamic adaptation of organisms to respond to developmental or environmental changes.

funded by FWF — Der Wissenschaftsfonts

Mission

At SFB (F80), RNA-DECO 12 research groups in Austria comprising of biochemists, biologists and bioinformaticians jointly aim at understanding the impact of chemical modifications on:

Structure & Function of specific RNAs using different models.

RNA modifications affect

Participants

Scientific Advisory Board

News

October 02 2020

1st Annual SFB RNA DECO Retreat

The 1st SFB RNA DECO annual retreat took place at Schlosshotel Mondsee in Salzburg on the 7th & 8th of September providing an overview of current research in the field of RNA especially chemical modifications of RNA.
20200908 115610

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July 10 2020

FWF establishes new specialist research area for RNA modifications

The Austrian Science Fund (FWF) is establishing a new specialist research area called RNA-DECO. Over the next four years, total funding of over €4 million will be provided to fund a total of 12 research groups, who will study the chemical modification of ribonucleic acid (RNA). Five of these research groups (Walter Rossmanith, Matthias Schäfer, Elisa Vilardo, Javier Martinez, Michael Jantsch) are based at MedUni Vienna. Overall project leader is Michael Jantsch, Head of MedUni Vienna’s Centre for Anatomy and Cell Biology.

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July 07 2020

Sabrina Summer defended her Ph.D. thesis successfully!

Sabrina Summer from Walter Rossmanith’s lab successfully defended her Ph.D. thesis on “YBEY is an essential biogenesis factor for mitochondrial ribosomes”.

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Publications

SLAMseq resolves the kinetics of maternal and zygotic gene expression in early zebrafish embryogenesis

Pooja Bhat, Luis E. Cabrera-Quio, Veronika A. Herzog, Nina Fasching, Andrea Pauli and Stefan L. Ameres

bioRxiv (2022) [preprint]

Synthesis of 4-thiouridines with prodrug functionalization for RNA metabolic labeling

Sarah Moreno, Melanie Brunner, Isabel Delazer, Dietmar Rieder, Alexandra Lusser and Ronald Micura

RSC Chem. Biol. (2022) [accepted]

Structural basis for the context-specific action of the classic peptidyl transferase inhibitor chloramphenicol

Egor A. Syroegin, Laurin Flemmich, Dorota Klepacki, Nora Vazquez-Laslop, Ronald Micura and Yury S. Polikanov

Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 29, 152–161 (2022)

Open Positions

Master Thesis • open since June 03 2022

Master Thesis Position in Small RNA Biology II

Medical University of Vienna
Centre for Anatomy and Cell Biology
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Matthias R. Schaefer
Schwarzspanierstr. 17, A-1090 Vienna
Tel: +43-1-40160-37702
E-mail: matthias.schaefer@meduniwien.ac.at
Group Schaefer

Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are indispensable components of the protein translation machinery. Rather recently, stress-induced and nuclease-mediated tRNA fragmentation has been discovered as an evolutionarily conserved phenomenon resulting in tRNA-derived small RNAs (tsRNAs) with various functions. What is currently impossible is visualizing tsRNAs at the subcellular level, since tsRNAs are not easily distinguished from parental tRNAs by classical hybridization-based techniques.
This M.Sc. thesis project will test and validate a number of novel RNA hybridization approaches tailored to visualize specific tsRNAs both in vitro and in situ using both human cancer cells and Drosophila embryos.
The successful applicant is required to have basic molecular biology skills (preferably experience with tissue culture). The position will be paid with 440 €/month for the duration of up to one year.
Starting date: September 2022
MSc position tsRNA Asymmetry 2

Master Thesis • open since June 03 2022

Master Thesis Position in Small RNA Biology I

Medical University of Vienna
Centre for Anatomy and Cell Biology
Assoc. Prof. Dr. Matthias R. Schaefer
Schwarzspanierstr. 17, A-1090 Vienna
Tel: +43-1-40160-37702
E-mail: matthias.schaefer@meduniwien.ac.at
Group Schaefer

Transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are indispensable components of the protein translation machinery. Rather recently, stress-induced and nuclease-mediated tRNA fragmentation has been discovered as an evolutionarily conserved phenomenon resulting in tRNA-derived small RNAs (tsRNAs) with various functions. It is currently unclear how exactly these small RNAs are produced from parental tRNAs. Since tRNAs are highly structured molecules, it is likely that dedicated enzymes unwind, stabilize and degrade particular tsRNAs.
This M.Sc. thesis project aims at identifying cellular activities, which act on tRNAs containing a nuclease-mediated “break” in their backbone. The approach will employ systematic RNA interference (RNAi) in tissue culture cells and biochemical in vitro experimentation.
The successful applicant is required to have basic molecular biology skills (preferably experience with tissue culture). The position will be paid (440 €/month) for the duration of up to one year.
Starting date: September 2022
MSc position tsRNA Asymmetry 1